Oklahoma County Sheriff gets newly advanced fleet of patrol cars

Oklahoma County Sheriff gets newly advanced fleet of patrol cars

The Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office received a new, advanced fleet of patrol cars.Thanks to Cares Act money, OCSO is now riding in style. Fifty patrol cars will be replacing the aging fleet and deputies said that these new squad cars are a game-changer.The cars are equipped with the latest technology to help improve response times, efficiency and safety.”In a pursuit and we have someone running from us, what you’ll see is we’ll start to slow down, the officer will slow down and then throw the door open and the car will stop. The vehicle does that on its own, I didn’t do anything,” said Major Charles Avery, OCSO.Purchased with Cares Act funds, the OCSO will learn how to operate their new fleet of cars.”Some of our cars are 2010-2011. They’re very old cars so what happens is those cars tend to break down. Sometimes they’ll break down in the middle of a call,” Avery said.The squad cars are equipped with the latest technology, such as light syncing.”Instead of you driving towards them and seeing a bunch of flashing lights, these lights are going to sync up and they’re going to do the same thing,” Avery said.They also have the ability to change the siren tone just by pushing the horn, and a new ventilation system that will keep law enforcement and passengers safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.”One of the main focuses of these vehicles is it’s got a separate ventilation system that allows the driver or officer upfront to have a completely different ventilation system from the person in the back seat which inherently keeps the officer safe,” Avery said. So far, the sheriff’s office has six of the 50 patrol cars. Due to the microchip shortage, they are only receiving about three to four cars per week.

The Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office received a new, advanced fleet of patrol cars.

Thanks to Cares Act money, OCSO is now riding in style. Fifty patrol cars will be replacing the aging fleet and deputies said that these new squad cars are a game-changer.

The cars are equipped with the latest technology to help improve response times, efficiency and safety.

“In a pursuit and we have someone running from us, what you’ll see is we’ll start to slow down, the officer will slow down and then throw the door open and the car will stop. The vehicle does that on its own, I didn’t do anything,” said Major Charles Avery, OCSO.

Purchased with Cares Act funds, the OCSO will learn how to operate their new fleet of cars.

“Some of our cars are 2010-2011. They’re very old cars so what happens is those cars tend to break down. Sometimes they’ll break down in the middle of a call,” Avery said.

The squad cars are equipped with the latest technology, such as light syncing.

“Instead of you driving towards them and seeing a bunch of flashing lights, these lights are going to sync up and they’re going to do the same thing,” Avery said.

They also have the ability to change the siren tone just by pushing the horn, and a new ventilation system that will keep law enforcement and passengers safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“One of the main focuses of these vehicles is it’s got a separate ventilation system that allows the driver or officer upfront to have a completely different ventilation system from the person in the back seat which inherently keeps the officer safe,” Avery said.

So far, the sheriff’s office has six of the 50 patrol cars. Due to the microchip shortage, they are only receiving about three to four cars per week.